1. Marine Pests
  2. Marine pests
  3. Identify
  4. Asian green mussel

Asian green mussel

​​​​​

Asian green mussel (Perna viridis)

Not established in Australia

Features: Juvenile is bright green, older shells are dark green to brown. Smooth with evenly spaced grooves. Grows 8–16cm long.
Habitat: Infrastucture, lower estuarine to marine, tropical to warm waters.
Affects: Native species, aquaculture.
Movement: Vessels.


Asian green mussel (Perna viridis) forms dense colonies that outcompetes natives for food and space. They can clog seawater cooling pipes and intake systems. It has arrived in Australia in ships arriving from Asian or Pacific ports, attached to niche areas (such as around rudders, sea chests).

What to look for

Features:

  • juvenile is bright green
  • older shells are dark green to brown, may have green edges to shells
  • smooth with evenly spaced (concentric) grooves
  • up to 8–16cm long.

Where to look

Look in or around:

  • aquaculture equipment
  • artificial structures, such as wharves
  • buoys
  • intake pipes
  • vessels, particularly niche areas.

Likely habitats include:

  • low tide mark and shallow waters, up to 42m deep
  • tropical to warm temperate waters.

Similar native species

These native species look similar to Asian green mussel. They do not need to be reported.

Expand all

Septifer bilocularis

Features:

  • colour varies (red, blue or green), internally blue
  • strong radial ridges
  • up to 5cm long.

Habitat:

  • attached to rocks or debris.

Known locations are northern Queensland, Northern Territory to Albany, Western Australia.


Stavelia subdistorta

Features:

  • brown shell, inside blue–white
  • dense evenly spaced (concentric) grooves
  • up to 15cm long.

Habitat:

  • attached to rock or debris
  • up to 30m deep.

Known locations are northern Queensland to northern Western Australia.




Report it

See something unusual? Report it. Even if you’re not sure.

If you see something you think is a pest:

  • note the exact location (screenshot your map app or enable photo geotagging on your phone)
  • take a photo (use something for size reference, like a coin or note)
  • contact your state or territory authority.

Report

Stop the spread of marine pests

Start with these simple steps:

  • Inspect and clean your boat or yacht. Make sure you check hard to reach areas.
  • Treat the hull of your boat or yacht regularly.
  • Clean and dry your fishing and diving gear after every use.

How you can stop the spread of marine pests.

Your location

Check our marine pests map.

The map shows known pests and pests to look for around Australia.